Children's University Hospital

Referral/Teaching Hospital | Dublin, Ireland

Hospital description

The Children’s Hospital was founded in 1872 in a house at 9 Upper Buckingham Street in Dublin. Initially it had only eight beds, although it its first year 104 patients were admitted and a further 1,768 were seen in the out-patients department. This initial success increased over the following years and this prompted the governing committee to invite The Irish Sisters of Charity to take over the complete running of the hospital; the Sisters took over on 2 July 1876.

In May 1879 the hospital moved to15 Upper Temple Street and in June 1879 the new hospital was formally opened with 21 beds. The hospital gradually increased in size by purchasing adjoining houses until in 1886 there were 70 beds in use and solid medical foundations were laid for hospital procedures. Over the next century the hospital established a reputation for excellent care for children, although it was not until 1954 that a two storey purpose built 56 bed ward block was built for the hospital.

The hospital has continually built on these solid and altruistic foundations to develop care for children, and it is now linked to both the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and University College Dublin for undergraduate and postgraduate training. It has been recognised no less than six times as one of the best large scale employers in Ireland.

The hospital will be moving to a new site with the Mater University Hospital in 2015.

Profile

Hospital type Referral/Teaching Hospital
Local language English
Funding Status Public

Location

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